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Guest Blog Post: From a Parent’s Perspective

Today, a couple whose daughter went through our program at Austin Recovery would like to share a bit of their insight about the journey from the point of view of the parents of an addict.

From a Parent's Perspective

From a Parent’s Perspective

What an educational, tearful, joyous, painful, hopeful, and inspiring journey treatment for addiction  has been…and that’s from the parents of the addict! We can’t believe what it must look like from the eyes of the addict. We stand in awe of so many accomplishments by so many.

It has been a long journey for us. From not understanding the disease, through Al-anon to help us understand ourselves, to becoming a part of the Austin Recovery family, all in support of someone so dear to us and for whom we spent so many nights wishing we could take her pain and struggle away or trade places (which we have learned is not possible!) Again, we stand in awe of our daughter’s work, accomplishments, and Program relationships that have been the foundation of success for her.

What we have learned is that success in addiction recovery is not possible without the “want to,” hard work, and commitment of the addict to embrace the Program; without the support of the Austin Recovery “family” of tireless efforts by Austin Recovery personnel and sponsors; and by the grace of the “higher power” for all of us.

Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, and today is promised to no one. We will always embrace an attitude of gratitude and treasure what today brings, and be grateful each and every day for the Austin Recovery program and family!

2014 Friends of Austin Recovery Luncheon Recap

 Hamilton BeazleySteve Hicks and Edith RoyalA week ago, 225 of us gathered at Riverbend Church for the Friends of Austin Recovery Annual Fall Luncheon. This luncheon is an annual gathering of Austin Recovery supporters and friends for a speaker presentation, while raising funds for Austin Recovery.

Jack Daniel, Board Chair of The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston, welcomed the crowd before introducing Mel Taylor.  Mel Taylor, President and CEO of Austin Recovery and The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston, shared agency updates from the past year, as well as exciting news about the year to come.  Mel had the honor of introducing our special guest speaker, author, professors, and thought-leader Hamilton Beazley, Ph.D.

Hamilton, who has been involved with both Austin Recovery and The Council for years, is the current Austin Recovery Chairman of the Board.  The crowd was moved and inspired as Hamilton shared his story.

After Hamilton’s speech, immediate past Board Chair Patti Halladay continued our tradition of honoring long-time supporter (and former Board member) Edith Royal with a bouquet of flowers.  Patti then announced Steve Hicks as the recipient of our annual Edith Royal Service Award.  Steve has also been a long-time supporter of Austin Recovery, currently serving on the Board of Trustees.  Steve helped co-chair our successful Capital Campaign, and his family’s support enabled us to name our Hicks Family Ranch in their honor.

We are looking forward to our annual Speaker Series Luncheon at Austin City Limits Live at The Moody Theater in May 2015!

Hollywood Veteran Jeffrey Tambor to Raise Awareness about Mental Health and Alcoholism at Houston Benefit

Hollywood Veteran Jeffrey Tambor to Raise Awareness about Mental Health and Alcoholism at Houston Benefit
The actor will share his personal story at The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston’s Annual Fall Luncheon

Council - 2014 Fall Luncheon - Home Page Button - Jeffrey TamborOn Friday, November 7, actor Jeffrey Tambor will tell his personal story of recovery from alcoholism and a family history of mental health issues at The Waggoners Foundation Speaker Series’ 2014 Fall Luncheon to benefit The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston. Co-chaired by Christi and Dean Quinn and Andrea and Andrew Steptowe, the event will once again take place at the Hilton Americas-Houston.

Jeffrey Tambor can best be described as a Hollywood veteran, performing on film, television and stage since the 1970’s.  While Jeffrey may be most recognizable for his recent television accomplishments including his memorable characters on The Larry Sanders Show and Arrested Development, he considers his greatest honor to be his accomplishments in his recovery.  Growing up in a family with a pattern of mental health issues, Jeffrey not only had to overcome his personal struggles, but also had to watch as the disease of alcoholism claimed the life of his older brother.  For Jeffrey, managing his recovery is a never-ending journey, one that can become bearable only with the love, support, and inspiration of others.

“We are fortunate when someone like Jeffrey Tambor opens up about the realities – and tragedies – that go along with co-occurring mental health issues and alcoholism,” said Mel Taylor, President and CEO of The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston. “The more we talk about it, the more we can reduce the stigma, which will empower more people to seek the help they need for themselves and their loved ones.”

According to a 2009 national study by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, approximately 8.9 million adults suffer from both a mental health and substance use disorder.  When both the mental health and substance abuse conditions are treated at the same time, outcomes are improved.  The Council provides individualized treatment services to every member of the family affected by addiction and other compulsive behaviors in order to address their co-occurring disorders.

Through counseling services and outpatient treatment as well as prevention and education programs, The Council impacts the lives of over 80,000 every year. The annual Fall Luncheon raises financial resources in support of The Council’s commitment to provide best-in-class services for both addiction and mental health disorders while turning no one away.  Tables and seats are currently available for purchase at www.Council-Houston.org.

Guest Blog Post: The “More or Less” of Addiction

Our Austin Recovery Alumni Association is a fellowship of graduates of Austin Recovery who want to share their experience, strength and hope with one another so that they may solve their common problem and help other alumni recover for their alcoholism and addiction. Today on the blog, one of our alums shares their personal journey and why they believe there is no such thing as “more or less” in the world of addiction.

The More or Less of Addiction

The “More or Less” of Addiction

I like to think more or less, that I am an alcoholic and drug addict. Except with the disease of addiction there is no such thing as “more or less” of an alcoholic and drug addict. You either have it or you don’t. There is no middle of the road diagnosis that says I may or may not have this disease. There is not a granular measure of my addiction.  No one person diagnosed is better off than the next person diagnosed. We have it, or we don’t. Drinking more or drinking less, shooting more or shooting less, does not grade the level of our addiction or our qualifications as one type of addict over the other.

What that means for me is I never have a day where I can say to myself, I’ll just have one shot of heroin or one line of coke. I can’t think of Tuesdays as my drinking day or Thursdays as my blunt day. It’s all days or no days. To non-addictive people this may sound like I am doomed to lead a miserable existence chained to an unimaginable burden. But that is far from the truth.

In fact my life is blessed with the miracle of recovery. And although I may never take an addictive substance without the risk of sending my life spiraling out of control, I do lead a life beyond my wildest dreams. Even my “normal” friends remark on the things I do and comment with a touch of envy. You may be wondering how someone with such a pervasive disease exists and even thrives in a world where alcohol consumption is widely accepted, even encouraged, and drugs are so readily available.

For this addict, it happens because of my faith. Not the faith that many find by attending church or religious organizations, although many have found their way out of this disease in those places. In my case, my faith is developed more each day. With each passing hour that I remain sober, my faith strengthens and grows. I find that being active in the act of helping others somehow keeps me connected to the source of power that also keeps me clean. I say “somehow” because I am not quite sure how it works. I just know that it does. It does not really compute to me how helping someone else is actually more beneficial to me than it is to the person I am helping.

If anyone reading this has been around recovery programs, you have heard the term “service work”. Service work is what we, who have a reprieve from the obsession and compulsion of addiction, refer to when we help someone else. Service work does not pay us in the traditional sense of dollars and cents, but it does return something much more valuable than money. It provides to us an insurance against that first drink or shot of dope.

The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous tells us “…nothing will so much insure immunity from drinking as intensive work with other alcoholics.”  I have found that to be the case for me as well. I have struggled with addiction most of my life. It was not until I started to get involved with service work that I realized that I could survive long term without giving into my disease.

I have met many friends through the course of my service work. Many of them in turn have helped me. It does not seem to matter to us which way the help is flowing as long as we are working for the right motives.

And because I am involved in the service aspect I am privy to opportunities I would not otherwise even know existed. I recently became vice-president of our recovery center alumni organization. This connects me with the clients at our in-patient treatment facilities to help them transition back into the real world after their 30 to 90 day stay in a protected environment. That connection stems from the fact that I was approached by the same organization when I first left treatment. It is a close and caring society that perpetuates the cycle of recovery rather than the cycle of addiction.

I cannot debate the idea of having this disease; it’s a pointless argument that has no productive outcome for me. But I can say that I am grateful that there is a solution to the problem of addiction, and I can say I am grateful for the fellowship that I have been introduced to, and I can say I am grateful for my recovery.

So while I can’t say that I am an alcoholic and addict – more or less, I can say I am more, not less because of the solution I have found.

Guest Blog Post: Parents, Are You Aware of These Current Drug Trends?

Are You Aware of These Current Drug Trends

Parents, Are You Aware of These Current Drug Trends?
Written by Jill Ahrens, Choices Program Manager, The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston

Drug trends are constantly changing, and it can be difficult as a parent, educator, or adult to keep up with the ever-changing ways teens are getting high, hiding their use, and sneaking around drug tests.  This summer at the Back to School Workshop, participants were presented with the most recent trends seen among adolescents today.

With the legalization of marijuana in certain states, our teens are receiving mixed messages about marijuana.  Teens today are frequently trying marijuana before alcohol and tobacco, and they are using inventive and creative ways to use it, hide it, and pass urine analyses.  Keep in mind, marijuana of today is much more potent than marijuana of the past.  Today’s marijuana contains much more THC, the active chemical in marijuana, than the marijuana of generations past, creating a greater euphoric effect and a higher likelihood for addiction.  Smoke shops around the country are selling vaporizers that teens are using to smoke the wax form of marijuana, also known as “dabbing”.  Smoke shops also sell kits with synthetic urine that one can strap to his/her leg or waistband to use to pass a urine analysis.  They even have fake soda cans that double as a place to stash marijuana without anyone ever noticing.

In addition to the concerns around marijuana sue, there are concerns about cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive component of Cannabis.  CBD is currently legal in all 50 states, and it is being marketed as “Cannabis E-liquid.”  CBD oils are typically vaporized, much like marijuana wax.  Though CBD does not contain THC, it is not FDA researched or approved.

Alcohol use and binge drinking is another concerning trend among teens.  One way teens are using alcohol is by purchasing alcopops, which typically contain up to 12% alcohol, whereas most beer or malt beverages contain about 4.5% alcohol.  Alcopops often come in 23.5 oz. containers, which means that they have much more alcohol in them, are in a bigger can, have a higher percentage of alcohol in them, and therefore are more dangerous.  Alcopops cans often look much like a kid-friendly can of lemonade, or sometimes very similar to an energy drink.   They are easy for teens to over-consume, and can often lead to alcohol poisoning.  Smoking alcohol is another concerning trend, as inhaling alcohol vapors causes an immediate, but dangerous, level of intoxication.  The real danger is that once it is inhaled, there is no turning back.  When we drink alcohol, our body has natural responses to rid our body of alcohol when it reaches toxic levels.  With inhaling alcohol, those natural responses don’t take place, so we can get to a toxic level without a way the remedy the situation.  This is how smoking or vaporizing alcohol can be deadly.

Another current drug trend is e-cigs and hookah.  Both e-cigs and hookah are used as ways to smoke nicotine without smoking traditional tobacco-filled cigarettes.  E-cigarettes are personal vaporizers that turn liquid solution into an aerosol mist.  The solutions used for e-cigs are not FDA regulated, and the long term outcomes and consequences are unknown.  One study researching the nicotine content in e-cig solution found that most solutions were labeled with inaccurate nicotine contents, perhaps in order to keep those trying to quit addicted.  Hookah has reportedly been used by 1 in 5 high school seniors, and 37% of college freshmen believe water pipes are less harmful than cigarettes.  In reality, according to WHO, an hour long hookah session is the equivalent of smoking 100 cigarettes.

I would encourage all parents, educators and adults to do their best to stay on top of the ever-changing drug and alcohol trends and stay vigilant of what’s going on with the teens in their lives. If you suspect your child or an adolescent you know may have an issue, please contact Austin Recovery or The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston to learn more about what you can do to help.

Mark Your Calendars for October Events at Austin Recovery!

Gateway to Recovery - October 1 & 8, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.*
*Note New Time!*
The Gateway to Recovery series provides information on how to detect addiction and what friends and families can do to help those needing treatment. This information series is free and often the first step in helping people find treatment and begin the healing process. Facilitated by Mary Boone, LCSW, LCDC, Gateway to Recovery is held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the first and second Wednesday of each month at Austin Recovery’s Center for Recovering Families office (3420 Executive Center Drive, Suite G100, Austin, Texas 78731).** Click here for more information.
**Note New Location!**

Friends of Austin Recovery Annual Fall Luncheon – October 9, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
This year’s guest speaker is author, professor, and thought-leader Hamilton Beazley, Ph.D.  The program will also include presentation of the annual Edith Royal Service Award to long-time Austin Recovery supporter Steve Hicks. The luncheon takes place at Riverbend Church (4214 N Capital of Texas Hwy, Austin, TX 78746). Click here for more information and to purchase seats.

As seen on a Sussex Directories Inc siteSecond Saturday Workshop - October 11, 10 a.m. to 12 noon
“Leveraging Technology to Enhance Addiction Treatment and Recovery” presented by RJ Garcia, MA, LCDC
Technology such as the Internet and mobile phones offers considerable promise for the assessment, prevention, and treatment of and recovery from substance use disorders. In this workshop you will be able to establish a better understanding of the promise of technology-based and therapeutic tools and mobile applications for those in the recovery journey. An excellent opportunity to learn about these new recovery tools for those on the recovery journey, their families, friends and professionals serving the recovery community. Two hours of continuing education credits are offered to chemical dependency professionals with LCDC, ADC, LMFT, LCSW and LMSW certifications as approved by DSHS and TCBAP. Second Saturday is held at Austin Recovery (4201 S. Congress Avenue, Suite 202, Austin, TX 78745).** Click here for more information.
**Note New Location!**

Austin Recovery Alumni Events
Join the Austin Recovery Alumni for fun events and fellowship throughout the week. Events include Sunday Night Alumni Speaker Meetings, Big Book study groups, Musical Journey, skating, hikes around Lady Bird Lake, drum circles, bowling nights, game nights, evenings at the coffee shop and more. For more information, contact Austin Recovery Alumni Services Coordinator Cary Acevedo at 512-697-8513 or click on the Alumni events link on www.AustinRecovery.org.

 Volunteer Opportunities at Austin Recovery
Austin Recovery is always looking for volunteers to provide additional support to our clients in residential addiction treatment in the following areas: financial planning, parenting skills, healthy relationships, job readiness/ interviewing skills, stress management, anger management, self-esteem and abuse issues. We also need volunteers for clerical work, yoga, arts and crafts, dance, spa days (pedicures, manicures, hairstyling), recreation and weightlifting. If you are interested or have questions, please contact Austin Recovery Director of Volunteer Services Erika Hagler at 512-697-8537 or ehagler@austinrecovery.org.

Guest Blog Post: It’s Not About The Numbers

Today, Emily Breeding who works in the Prevention Resource Center (PRC) Region 6 with our sister organization, The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston, shares a bit of personal and statistical information surrounding a recent study the PRC published. The study comes from a needs assessment conducted to provide the state of Texas and the local community of Region 6 (13-county area surrounding Houston) with comprehensive information about adolescent drug and alcohol use.

“It’s Not About The Numbers”
By Emily Breeding, M.A., Regional Evaluator for the Prevention Resource Center, The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston

I’m a researcher and data analyst. I deal with numbers and statistics every day. For the last two months, I’ve been immersed in co-writing a 50-page report full of numbers, like these for example –

RNA Infographic

But my work is not really about numbers. It’s about individual lives and choices and stories. Several weeks ago I was researching a difficult topic, deaths by overdose in my region. I saw a lone one in a field of zeros. It said that in a fairly large semi-urban county, one minor died of a drug overdose that year. Only one, I thought. That’s good. But the one stuck with me. Later, I talked with my college-age nephew. He mentioned that he’s glad I’m doing prevention work because he was hurt and shocked by overdose death of a kid in his high school graduating class, whom he knew. I checked the year and the location, and his friend was the one I had paused over earlier and could not shake. I was sad for this loss and how it affected my nephew, but I was also relieved to know some of this young man’s story, to be reminded that numbers are but reflections of the lives, private struggles, and triumphs of the families in my community.

Our task at the Prevention Resource Center is to gather data on youth drug and alcohol abuse in our 13-county region, in terms of risk and protective factors, consumption patterns, and consequences. Our project is data-driven, but it’s not about the numbers. It’s about the people who make a choice every day to live outside of incidence rates, and how we can support them. I’m proud of every adolescent in my region who doesn’t show up in my data, and I care about each one who does.

To learn more about the Prevention Resource Center or to view their latest report, please visit to www.prc6.org

Join Us for Our Friends of Austin Recovery Annual Fall Luncheon

Join us for this year’s Friends of Austin Recovery Annual Fall Luncheon on Thursday, October 9 from 11:30 am to 1:00 pm. This year’s esteemed guest speaker is author, professor, and thought-leader, Hamilton Beazley, Ph.D.

Dr. Beazley is a Scholar-in-Residence at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas and a former Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at The George Washington University in Washington D.C. Prior to his academic career, Dr. Beazley served in a variety of executive positions including President of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Inc., New York City and is a former member of the Executive Committee of the Division on Addictions of the Harvard Medical School. He is the author of seven books, including the award winning No Regrets, and has appeared on “Oprah Winfrey,” NBC, CNN, CNBC, Fox and a host of radio programs from coast to coast.

Click here for more information and to register.

Friends of AR Luncheon 2014 - Invitation - ONLINE VERSION

Guest Blog Post: A Year of Firsts

My name is Maryse Saffle, and I serve as the Experiential Coordinator at Austin Recovery. As we celebrate Recovery Month, as well as commemorate 9/11, I am reminded of the impact both of these events continue to have on my life. Let me take you back to 2001….

IMG_3851

I had been isolating and feeling stuck, suicidal and hopeless for a long time. When 9/11 happened, I was glued to the TV for days, albeit drunk or high, but somehow my own personal fog of self-pity began to lift. Here were people who had REAL problems, here were stories of loss and despair, but also hope and overcoming and selflessness. How small my world had become, in the face of the human drama unfolding on the screen.…I made a decision I had been contemplating for 6 months, made arrangements for my son and my dog to be taken care of, and entered detox at Austin Recovery on October 2nd, 2001. Nothing would ever be the same.

I had a vital spiritual experience at Austin Recovery that changed my life. I learned a lot about the disease, and a little about myself during that month. But mainly, I learned about the Steps and a fellowship of people just like me who could help me. Treatment worked, now recovery was beginning…

November 8th was my discharge date, and I returned to Temple, and attended my first meeting in a non-descript, cigarette smelling house; I was so afraid before entering these rooms, shaky and self-conscious, but ended up meeting a tribe who took me under their collective wing for that first year. My first trip to the grocery store triggered all kinds of memories even looking at the beer aisle, cravings rushed through me from nowhere, demons waiting to pounce…I prayed my ass off, and could not wait for the next meeting, to release these thoughts and get support. I also came back to Austin Recovery every Sunday for about 6 months, to attend the service and the Alumni meetings. That place was hallowed ground for me.

Next came the first trip home to Switzerland at Christmas, barely 2 months sober, back to the place where I learned to drink, and where wine is an intrinsic and cultural part of the social fabric. YIKES! Bloody Mary called my name on the flight, but I ignored her, all the while noticing how weird it felt to travel without booze. My family graciously agreed to drink apple juice with our Christmas dinner, where the norm was 5 or 6 courses, and just as many kinds of wine pairings. Only the first year, mind you, after that, it was my job to stay sober. I attended AA meetings in French, and once again, met tribe members who helped me stay sober.

And then came my first “crush”…an AA member with 14 years of sobriety…even though my sponsor and counselor had told me not to get involved in a romantic relationship for a year, I started feeling the familiar stirrings of what I now know as codependency. But then, I justified those feelings and thought they just did not understand, I was different, and this guy was sober after all…It took barely 3 months for me to realize how right they both were, I was unable to focus on myself, and projecting all my unmet needs on a person who was himself known as a predator in the rooms…I remained sober through it all, even though he stated he was so hurt when I ended it.

That was another first: recognizing when a relationship was wrong, and ending it in a clear, concise, non-dramatic way. It was time to establish a healthy relationship with myself. I refocused on working the program, and dedicated myself to taking AA meetings to Bell County Jail, another first.

Now I had never been to jail, through no effort of my own, mind you. It was clearly grace that saved me, on two continents, after dealing heroin and meth, and too many drunk or high shenanigans to remember. Not even a DWI….these women were doing MY time! Focusing on service work, and helping others addicts/alcoholics, nurtured the seed that AR had planted: this is what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I made a decision to return to school to become a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor. All these years of research and “on the job training” were finally paying off!

There were other, smaller sober “firsts”: the first football game, the first New Year celebration, the first birthday, the first dance, etc. But throughout that first year, I held out for the next colored coin and key ring, those little token handed out at meetings to celebrate times of sobriety, both in AA and NA. 60 days, 90 days, 6 months, 9 months….and finally, a year! Hard to believe, but I had made it, with spiritual and human help. I kept a journal of my inner states of mind, simply sharing with God what was going on, and every year at this time, I read again the daily entries during my stay in treatment. Humbling and powerful….

Nowadays, I am simply blessed to work daily with my tribe, and help others find what I have found here: a deep connection with my higher power and myself, which are one and the same. Spirituality is not a treatment outcome, it is the ESSENCE of what we are.

Mark Your Calendars for September Events at Austin Recovery

Gateway to Recovery - September 3 & 10, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.*
*Note New Time!*
The Gateway to Recovery series provides information on how to detect addiction and what friends and families can do to help those needing treatment. This information series is free and often the first step in helping people find treatment and begin the healing process. Facilitated by Mary Boone, LCSW, LCDC, Gateway to Recovery is held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the first and second Wednesday of each month at Austin Recovery’s Center for Recovering Families office (3420 Executive Center Drive, Suite G100, Austin, Texas 78731).** Click here for more information**Note New Location!**

300_5x7_JamesH2013_08_07_AUG_5225Retouch - CROPSecond Saturday Workshop – September 13, 10 a.m. to 12 noon
“Confessions of a Recovery Hypnotist: Mind-Body Approaches to Maintaining Sobriety” presented by James Hazlerig, MA, CHP
Hypnosis is real, it’s powerful, and it can help you maintain sobriety – but of course it’s not what you’ve seen on TV. In this experiential workshop, you’ll discover how hypnosis actually works, how a hypnosis practitioner can support your recovery, and how guided self-hypnosis and goal-oriented meditation can help you to change your life-and keep the change! Two hours of continuing education credits are offered to chemical dependency professionals with LCDC, ADC, LMFT, LCSW and LMSW certifications as approved by DSHS and TCBAP. Second Saturday is held at Austin Recovery (4201 S. Congress Avenue, Suite 202, Austin, TX 78745).** Click here for more information.**Note New Location!**

Big Texas Rally for Recovery – Saturday, September 13, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., State Capitol Grounds, South Steps
Let’s make history in Texas! Join thousands of people from across this great state at our State Capitol in Austin for National Recovery Month, Saturday, September 13th, 2014, to show your support for people living in and seeking Recovery in Texas from addiction and co-occurring mental health conditions. Join people in recovery, their family members and friends, addiction treatment professionals and allies in Texas. Let’s spread the positive message that people can and do recover.  Click here for more information.

Second Annual Mulligan Open Benefitting Austin Recovery Alumni Association - Saturday, September 20, 12:30 p.m.
The Alumni Association is hosting the Second Annual Golf Tournament at Balcones Country Club Saturday, September 20, 2014, beginning with a Putting Contest at 12:30 p.m. We are currently accepting donations and team registrations.  Funds from the event cover the cost of Alumni events and help those new in recovery pay for the costs of Alumni events throughout the year. The cost to play per person is $75. Get your team ready as prizes are available in different events.  The event takes place at Balcones Country Club (8600 Balcones Club Drive, Austin, Texas 78750).  Contact Allen J. at 512-825-0772 for more information.

Austin Recovery Alumni Events
Join the Austin Recovery Alumni for fun events and fellowship throughout the week. Events include Sunday Night Alumni Speaker Meetings, Big Book study groups, Musical Journey, skating, hikes around Lady Bird Lake, drum circles, bowling nights, game nights, evenings at the coffee shop and more. For more information, contact Austin Recovery Alumni Services Coordinator Cary Acevedo at 512-697-8513 or click on the Alumni events link on www.AustinRecovery.org.

 Volunteer Opportunities at Austin Recovery
Austin Recovery is always looking for volunteers to provide additional support to our clients in residential addiction treatment in the following areas: financial planning, parenting skills, healthy relationships, job readiness/ interviewing skills, stress management, anger management, self-esteem and abuse issues. We also need volunteers for clerical work, yoga, arts and crafts, dance, spa days (pedicures, manicures, hairstyling), recreation and weightlifting. If you are interested or have questions, please contact Austin Recovery Director of Volunteer Services Sinclair Fleetwood at 512-697-8537 or sfleetwood@austinrecovery.org.